ProMIS™ Neurosciences, Inc., headquartered in Toronto Ontario, and with offices in Cambridge Massachusetts, is publicly traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange (ticker symbol: PMN.TO) and OTCQB (ticker symbol: ARFXF).ProMIS is a  development stage biotechnology company focused on discovering and developing antibody therapeutics selectively targeting toxic oligomers implicated in the development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson’s disease (PD).

The Company’s scientific foundation is centered on the growing consensus that toxic oligomers  are key drivers of neurodegenerative diseases. Toxic oligomers are characterized by their neurotoxicity and ability to progressively spread throughout the brain, killing neurons, and are considered root cause of several neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson’s disease (PD).

Core Science & Technology. The company is based around the leading science of Dr. Neil Cashman, Professor of Medicine at the University of British Columbia, Neuroscientist at the Brain Research Center, and Academic Director of the Vancouver Coastal Hospital ALS Center. For over two decades, Neil Cashman has been among the leaders in the field of misfolded proteins-toxic oliogmers (with over 300 publications and over 10,000 citations and 70 patent applications) and is one of several leading researchers in the field of toxic oligomers  in neurodegenerative diseases.

Discovery Platform & Intellectual Property. ProMIS Neurosciences utilizes two proprietary computational discovery technologies, ProMIS™ and Collective Coordinates, to predict novel targets known as Disease Specific Epitopes (DSEs) on the molecular surface of toxic oligomers. ProMIS Neurosciences has a robust patent estate with over 75 patents issued or pending for disease specific epitopes (targets) and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) selectively targeting toxic oligomers implicated in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (oligomers of amyloid beta), ALS (oligomers of SOD1, TDP43) and Parkinson’s disease (oligomers of alpha synuclein).